Tuesday, September 16, 2014

CDC Report on Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence in the U.S. Explores Victimization and Impact

From:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

On September 5, CDC released “Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States,” using 2011 data from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).

The CDC findings include:
• Nearly 1 in 5 women (19%) and 1 in 59 men (nearly 2%) in the U.S. have been raped at some time in their lives.
• One in 5 women (22%) and 1 in 7 men (14%) reported experiencing severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.
• One in 7 women (15%) and 1 in 18 men (6%) have experienced stalking victimization during their lifetime in which they felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed. Much of stalking victimization was facilitated by technology (i.e., unwanted phone calls and text messages).

These findings emphasize that sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence are major public health problems in the U.S. Results suggest these forms of violence are frequently experienced at an early age, with a majority reporting victimization before age 25. Consistent with previous studies, results suggest women, in particular, are heavily impacted over their lifetime and certain racial/ethnic groups experience a comparatively higher burden.

To view “Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States,” click here.

For more about The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS), click here.

For the NISVS infographic from the CDC, click here.

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